Rethinking the 3 R’s

In My Morning Basket: Apricot ABC (aka The Best Alphabet Book Ever)

ApricotABCCover

Have you ever read a book and thought, “Why haven’t I ever heard of this book? Why isn’t everyone talking about this book? Did I miss something? People must know about this book!” (If you have, please, please share it in the comments below!) I just finished reading this kind of book to my 5-year-oldRead more …

Homeschooling with Preschoolers: Plan for 2014-2015

I’m trying something new this year. I’ll have a 4th grader that I’m starting more formal work with, a 1st grader who will be doing very light school, a preschooler who is just along for the ride, and halfway through the year I’ll have a newborn. And possibly a nervous breakdown. I’ll keep you posted.Read more …

Teaching with Real Experiences: Part 4 in the Three R’s Series

Aug 7, 2013 | Posted by in Education Theory, Rethinking the 3 R's | 0

“If we taught babies to talk as most skills are taught in school, they would memorize lists of sounds in a predetermined order and practice them alone in a closet.”  Linda Darling-Hammond, Stanford Graduate School of Education In the first few posts of this series, we talked about taking a relaxed approach to homeschooling andRead more …

Relationship Based Learning: Part 2 in the Three R’s Series

EarlyGrades

In my last post I suggested a new set of “R’s” to guide our homeschool philosophy, particularly in the early grades. I proposed A relaxed approach based on relationships and real experiences. I then encouraged us all to take a deep breath and relax. Today, I want to think about the role of relationships in our homeschools.Read more …

When to Push, When to Hold Back: An Introduction to Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development Theory

Recently in my homeschool circles, there has been much discussion of when it might be appropriate to push/encourage/nudge our children. How can we discern whether a little encouragement or guidance from us will help them jump to the next level of competence, or push them over the edge of frustration? Lev Vygotsky, the great educationalRead more …